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Black-Eyed Pea Chili for New Year’s Good Luck

Black-eyed peas are eaten year-round, but it is believed that they bring prosperity when consumed on New Year’s Day. So bake up a batch of this boldly-flavored Chili, using black-eyed peas rather than kidney or pinto beans…and may good luck rain down on you!!

Black-Eyed Pea Chili for Good Luck on New Year's

Black-Eyed Pea Chili for Good Luck on New Year’s

What are Black-Eyed Peas?
Black-eyed peas (also known as cowpeas) are actually beans so you can use them anywhere you might use beans. They get their name from the characteristic “black eye” or black spot on each bean.

You can cook up a batch from scratch, starting with dry beans which will require soaking. Or, buy them canned and be sure to rinse with water in a sieve until the water runs clear to remove excess sodium. You remove nearly 40% of the sodium that way.

Where to Buy Black-Eyed Peas?
Around the holidays, I have found them in stores in pre-cooked form in plastic tubs that only require a 10 minute boil. They’re especially fresh this way, but if all you can find is canned go with that. Again, just be sure to rinse canned beans very well.

Black-eyed peas are full of good things for your body: protein, fiber, folate… and they are low in fat. So, enjoy this coming New Year’s—or anytime!

Black-Eyed Pea Chili
Adapted with permission from 1,000 Gluten-Free Recipes by Carol Fenster (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2008)
Whip up a batch of this flavorful chili and serve it on New Year’s Day to bring good luck throughout the coming year. Plus, you’re doing your body a healthy favor, too. If you want to be authentic, serve this chili with collard greens (whose green color represents money) and cornbread (which represents gold).

2 teaspoons canola oil
1 pound ground turkey
2 teaspoons canola oil
2 cans (14.5 ounces each) black-eyed peas, rinsed and drained
2 cans (14.5 ounces each) petite diced tomatoes with green chiles, including juice
1 can (4 ounces) diced green chiles, drained
1 small onion, peeled and sliced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh oregano or 1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon ground cumin
[1/2] teaspoon table salt
[1/4] teaspoon cayenne pepper
4 cups gluten-free, low-sodium chicken broth or vegetable broth
2 garlic cloves, minced
[1/2] cup chopped fresh cilantro, divided
1 cup grated Monterey Jack cheese, for garnish

Per serving: 535 Calories ; 13g Fat; 5g Saturated Fat; 43g Protein; 12g Fiber; 68g Carbohydrates; 352mg Sodium ; 60mg Cholesterol

[1] In a Dutch oven or other deep, heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the turkey and cook until browned, about 7 to 10 minutes. Add the beans, tomatoes, chiles, onion, oregano, cumin, salt, cayenne, broth, garlic and [1/4] cup cilantro.

[2] Cover and cook on medium-low heat for 30 to 40 minutes. Ladle into the soup bowls and serve immediately, garnished with a sprinkle of cheese and the remaining [1/4] cup chopped cilantro.
Makes 8 servings.

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